Tuesday, June 30, 2009

June 30 in San Antonio history...

1892
Otto Praeger, the young reporter who started to the City of Mexico on his bicycle April 3, reached his destination yesterday afternoon and was given a rousing reception.

1905
A group of Army officers thanked the city for erecting a crosswalk at Grayson and New Braunfels so that they would not get their boots muddy in rainy weather.

1925
San Antonio stores featured a new lipstick that would not wash off when the wearer went in swimming.

1936
Rising creeks and raging ravines from a 3.74 inch rain which started the previous night menaced Bexar County farm lands and homes.

1954
Bexar County's traffic fatalities for 1954 reached 31, compared with 7 at this time last year.

2002
A storm system dumps six inches of rain on the Hill Country and up to ten inches in various places around South Texas. The rain persists for three days and causes San Antonio's worst flooding since 1998.

June 29 in San Antonio History...

1885
A drunk mistook a Houston St. lamppost for a policeman, cursed it, slugged it and smashed his fist.

1902
Yesterday was a recordbreaker for hot weather in San Antonio for this season, the mercury going up as high as 104 and 110 at various places.

1945
M&S and P&S Hospitals announced they would merge their operations and use the same buildings on Romana Plaza and Madison Square.

1952
Dread polio was at the near-epidemic stage in San Antonio. Six resident cases reported with in the week have brought the 1952 San Antonio total to 64- just 16 cases short of a mild epidemic.

1954
San Antonians will soon have an opportunity to view color TV. Date and time for the experimental telecast will be announced later.

1955
San Antonio's water level had dropped to a record low of 627.28 feet above sea level and Water Board officials said there was a strong possibility it would continue to drop as summer heat continued.

1956
Rock 'n' roll records were removed from juke boxes at city swimming pools because, according to the assistant parks director, of "undesirable incidents" which allegedly were caused by the music.

Sunday, June 28, 2009

June 28 in San Antonio history...

1892
The old blacksmith shop on upper Soledad St. is falling into decay. It should be torn down before it falls.

1897
The last game between the Express team and the Light Cadets has never been reported. The Cadets won 9 to 8 after both sides got tired and quit.

1905
The weather observer said that the 20 inches of rain that drenched San Antonio during the spring represented 75 per cent of the city's expected total for the entire year.

1907
Citizens residing in San Antonio's South Heights will have their homes illuminated by electricity for the first time tonight.

1912
Within a few days it will be possible to tell the time by looking at the clock in the tower of the city hall. The machinery has been repaired and work was begun today painting the four faces.

1952
Possibility of a strike of San Antonio Transit Co. bus drivers loomed Saturday. Chances appeared slim that a new contract would be signed before the present one between the company and Motor Coach Operators Local No. 694 expires Monday midnight.

Saturday, June 27, 2009

June 27 in San Antonio history...

1886
The contract for the removal of the old buildings on Alamo Plaza was about to be let.

1897
Some school children seem to be masters in profanity and vie each other in spitting out vulgarity. The school board should check this growing evil.

1902
A "norther" for the latter part of June, such as San Antonio is now experiencing, causes many to smile and wonder what next.

1912
A new bunting flag was put up over the Alamo yesterday afternoon to replace the old cotton one which was tattered and torn. It has only been within the past few months that the Texas flag has waved over the Alamo. Heretofore, the United States flag was used.

1922
A third long-distance record was made by the radiophone at Kelly Field recently when its messages were heard in the City of Mexico.

1947
A crack-down on motor scooters by San Antonio and Alamo Heights police loomed today following the second fatal scooter accident of the year.

Friday, June 26, 2009

June 26 in San Antonio history...

1894
A. de la Rio, arrested in San Antonio by Officer Coe as a Peeping Tom, was dismissed by the city recorder after he testified he was watching his former sweetheart with a rival suitor.

1917
Three aviation camps are to be established in the San Antonio area. They will supplement the activities of Camp Kelly, each having 1,000 officers and 144 aeroplanes.

1942
Maj. Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower is well remembered by veteran sports followers of San Antonio. He coached the St. Louis College (now St. Mary's University) football team in 1916.

1952
Gen. Anastacio Somoza, president of Nicaragua, will arrive in San Antonio at 10 am Friday from Austin. He will be met at the city limits by Mayor Sam Bell Steves and a group of citizens.

1999
The Spurs win their first NBA Championship in five games over the New York Knicks.

Thursday, June 25, 2009

June 25 in San Antonio history...

1906
The City Council passed an ordinance requiring auto owners to have both fore and aft lights and numbers on each car belonging to council members.

1954
A man who found it too hot to sleep in his bedroom but dozed off when he went outside and sat on a bannister received first-aid treatment at the Green Hospital. He fell 25 feet from a second-story porch.

1957
Housewives in San Antonio are complaining because hamburger meat has gone up to 39 cents a pound.

1966
A new 1966 Volkswagen could be bought in San Antonio for $1,658.50.

1977
Participants in a forum on homosexual rights last night mapped plans for a march tomorrow to culminate local observances of "Gay Pride Week" here in San Antonio.

Wednesday, June 24, 2009

June 24 in San Antonio history...

1894
Ernest Rische announced he had purchased the Old Cobweb saloon and that he was changing its name to the Old Turner Hall Saloon.

1902
A horse attacked Mrs. H.W. at her home last night and bit off her right ear. The family rushed to her rescue.

1935
A livewire medium who had red and yellow sparks shooting from his fingertips, was arrested with 250 of his followers in a raid on a west side seance.

1936
Parking meters were to be placed on all downtown streets between Market and Travis and from Alamo to Military Plaza.

1949
Trinity Baptist Church is founded.

Tuesday, June 23, 2009

June 23 in San Antonio history...

1886
The new Weiss beer was said to be hitting favorably with local male residents.

1892
Watermelons are coming into the city in immense quantity. The crop this year is splendid.

1895
The Light warened that "a certain pompous individual who bought a pistol for the editor and reporters" would need "prayers, too, if he ever came around" the office.

1915
The St. Anthony Hotel opened its new roof garden with the Royal Hungarian Orchestra and the dancing of Fenner and Tolman.

1936
City commissioners awarded a bid for the installation of 1000 downtown parking meters.

1944
Game Warden A. E. Hitzfelder warned Bexar County citizens that a state law providing fines up to $200 prohibits the handling of fawns or taking them as pets.

1952
San Antonio, now experiencing the second highest polio incidence on record, is still 22 cases short of a mild epidemic. There have been 58 polio cases in the city this year and eight deaths due to the disease.

Monday, June 22, 2009

June 22 in San Antonio history...

1892
Members of the San Antonio Banjo Club were out in a hack yesterday serenading.

1894
The singing class of the German Socialist Society held its regular weekly rehearsal with a beer party at San Antonio's Mission Gardens. Several sour notes were sounded.

1922
The mystery of the hidden pot of gold, found yesterday on old Romana Plaza, now known as Wescott Place, probably will never be solved. The treasure is estimated to have totaled more than $1,000.

1924
Highways between San Antonio and Kingsville were flooded after a 13-inch rain fell on that area within ten hours.

1944
Five suburban areas with about 100,000 resident were annexed to San Antonio by a City Council vote of 3 to 2. Areas included Hot Wells, South San, Harlandale and parts of Edgewood and northern San Antonio.

1945
The mayors of Olmos Park and Terrell Hills denounced San Antonio's attempt to annex their communities. They claimed their cities had better police departments and better streets.

Thursday, June 18, 2009

June 21 in San Antonio history...

1892
The water in the West End [Woodlawn] lake has fallen more than three feet since last August.

1915
The city advertised for bids on paving E. Houston, Main, Avenue C (Broadway), S. Presa and S. Flores.

1922
A pot of gold was unearthed on the site of the new park at Main Ave. and Romana St. today. Workmen reported the gold was in $5, $10 and $20 pieces but gave no estimate of the total find.

1925
The Missouri Pacific Railroad announced plans for a $50,000 Monte Vista station to serve 100,000 people every five years.

1942
Men love the snakes in the zoo's new reptile house and the women are fascinated but scared of them. Fred Stark, director, reports. The reptile house opened Monday [June 15].

1952
Beer flowed like water for a time on Culebra Road. Almost 50 cases tumbled to the highway when a brewery truck rounded a curve.

June 20 in San Antonio history...

1886
Work began in earnest on the new Opera house, with the first old shed occupying the building's site taken away.

1904
Police Chief Irvin announced he would rigidly enforce a new ordinance requiring San Antonio automobiles to be numbered.

1906
The architect for Alamo Heights said the new addition would be "a strictly fashionable residence area."

1914
River Commissioner George Surkey went swimming with a group of friends in the San Antonio river. He forgot, however, to bring his bathing suit and jumped in wearing his trousers.

1915
The right-of-way of the new Austin Post Rd. north of San Antonio was graveled.

1934
A prisoner booked for drunkenness at San Antonio jail asked the desk sergeant to check his most valuable possession - a glass eye.

1947
A roller coaster, the first to be used in San Antonio since 1915, will open Aug. 15 in Playland Park.

June 19 in San Antonio History...

1892
The engine house for the Second Ward fire company is being built at the corner of Romana Street and San Pedro Avenue.

1906
The city council passed an ordinance outlawing electric display signs which extend across city sidewalks.

1912
A minimum temperature of 59 degrees was recorded at 7 o'clock this morning by the government thermometer in the Hicks Bidg. This was cooler than it has been in June since 1903.

1942
A new telephone central office named "Travis" in memory of Col. William Barrett Travis, hero of the Alamo, will go into service here Saturday at midnight.

1954
The City Council was to meet in special session to discuss the segregation issue after six Negro boys went swimming in Woodlawn pool.

June 18 in San Antonio history...

1885
The city planned a new study of the waterworks after President George W. Brackenridge refused to sell out.

1895
The [San Antonio] Light commented that the city council meeting was "long and drawn out and exceedingly windy and full of words."

1906
The Democratic County Executive Committee voted to allow Negroes to vote in the coming Bexar County primaries.

1914
City Council rejected a delivery of light summer uniforms for San Antonio police officers, with the result policemen were sweating out the summer in their winter blues.

1922
Babies on Government Hill are to have a free clinic and welfare station through the generosity of an anonymous San Antonio resident. It will be erected at Mason and North Pine St.

1976
If a sampling of San Antonians is any indication of what local residents think of the San Antonio Spurs joining the National Basketball Association, the general consensus seems to be, "It's great!"

Wednesday, June 17, 2009

June 17 in San Antonio history...

1886
Men were prohibited from smoking in street cars while occupying front seats, but women were permitted to smoke anywhere in the car.

1892
The first news of the young newspaper reporter, Otto Praeger, now "doing" Mexico on a bicycle, since he was lost in the Sierra Madres, was received by his family.

1895
N.W. Levy proposed to set up a distillery in San Antonio to make cider from watermelons.

1904
The I. & G.N. Railroad announced special excursion rates would be extended to Negroes on Emancipation Day weekend between San Antonio and all points on the railway.

1912
Two Pinkerton detectives spent practically all of last week in San Antonio working on the burglary at the home of Alex Joske, in which $7,500 worth of diamonds and jewelry was taken.

1952
A break in a 22-year old water main at Commerce and South Presa disrupted traffic for four hours Monday afternoon.

1954
San Antonio's water level at 632.76 feet above sea level was only scant inches from a new all-time low. (647.2 as of 6/16/2009)

Tuesday, June 16, 2009

June 16 in San Antonio history...

1892
West End pavilion has been moved further into the lake and, under the rays of the electric light, dancing is fine.

1914
Alderman A. B. Weakly ordered all boys and men who swim in the San Antonio River to wear bathing suits with vests, not merely trunks.

1927
A resolution changing the name of Oakland to N. St. Mary's will be passed by the city commission June 20.

Found between the mission and the San Antonio River, the stolen altar bell of San Jose is back on its ancient shelf today.

1936
San Antonio was expected to score further gains as the nation's most important military center, as the Army was to increase its local strength from 147,000 to 165,000.

June 15 in San Antonio history...

1887
The Catholic clergy has decided to erect a chapel in the San Fernando Catholic Cemetery.

1897
The policy shops have been crowded of late with colored people preparing for an Emancipation Day spree.

1927
A two-cent jump overnight brought the price of gasoline to 18 cents a gallon.

1955
Superintendent of Schools Thomas B. Portwood said San Antonio schools hoped to make a beginning at integration of white and Negro student in schools in the fall.

1967
Construction workers at the new San Antonio Library were expected to return to work after a dispute involving metal cups, which some workers said were unsanitary.

June 14 in San Antonio history...

1885
An Observer said that since the electric lights went out in Alamo Plaza it has become the "promenade of mortals under the spell of love's young dream."

1902
Pioneer Mills of C.H. Guenther and Sons has been awarded the contract to purchase flour for the U.S. commissary in San Antonio.

1916
Miss Marjorie Stinson was slated to demonstrate the airplane as an instrument of war by dropping four bombs as she flew over Ft. Sam Houston's civilian training camp.

1935
Steve Catalani was photographed holding a four-foot alligator caught at Main and Mistletoe after a heavy rain a day earlier.

1942
War-stirred Texans, with the epic saga of Bataan endelibly imprinted on their hearts, gathered in a giant rally in San Antonio's Municipal Auditorium to pay ribute to our war dead and to Gen. Douglas MacArthur and to reaffirm their loyalty to Old Glory.

Saturday, June 13, 2009

June 13 in San Antonio history...

1885
Col. Augustus Belknap held a picnic for city school children at San Pedro Park.

1906
The City Council was preparing to draft an ordinance requiring all autos to sport front and rear lights and numbers.

1917
Because it has lost its commercial value, owners of the Governor's Palace have revealed plans to tear the building down.

1922
An earth tremor that made windows rattle and bottles wobble on shelves was felt in San Antonio shortly before 12 o'clock last night.

1935
Rumors swept the city that Olmos dam was cracking after a 3.77 inch rain produced minor floods all over town and water neared the dam's top.

1952
A case of confused identity in the vegetable kingdom has sprouted in the garden of Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Sparks of Natalia. Their potato vines are bearing tomatoes.

Friday, June 12, 2009

June 12 in San Antonio history...

1894
An increase of tourists was noted in San Antonio with more than 400 people crowding the Hot Sulphur Wells resort for health baths.

1906
The city council was preparing to draft an ordinance prohibiting the hanging of all electric signs over sidewalks.

1922
Opposition to the proposed incorporation of Alamo Heights as a municipality is growing among the residents of that section following the statement by City Attorney T. H. Ridgeway that the city does not intend to take in the addition.

1944
Marine SSgt. William J. Bordelon Jr. of San Antonio was announced as posthumous recipient of the Congressional Medal of Honor. He died at Tarawa.

Short Stops
What People are Saying (continued)
________________________________________________
J. M. Devine served as mayor from January, 1849, to January 1850, and filled the office for three more terms. Dr. Devine was an able man, but his career as mayor was during one of the most boisterous and lawless periods of the history of our city–mob law prevailed and the doctor finally fled the city never to return again, only as a visitor. Politics, or what we call politics, became a factor. It was when knownothingism was rampant. The Democratic party was called into action and the contest was waged from 1853 to 1856. Dr. Devine was a Democrat.

John M. Carolan was mayor from January, 1854, to January 1855. John Carolan was a Democrat and a man fearless of danger, and in every way a strong character. He was a business man and took to politics reluctantly.

James R. Sweet succeeded Carolan and was the first and only knownothing mayor our city ever had—(that’s one on Hicks). Mr. Sweet was a man of exceptional ability. He was a scholar and a shrewd business man—in looking over the list from first to last, I know of no one, not excepting Hicks, who was a match for James R. Sweet. He made a good mayor and was again re-elected in 1859, and again in 1860 and 1861, and 1862, going out of office in 1863 during the Civil War.

A. A. Lockwood, a leading merchant, was elected mayor in 1857, and served two terms until 1859. He was also a mayor much approved of.

P. L. Burqnor [sic] served as mayor from January, 1864, to January, 1865. He was the Confederate mayor and is still alive and residing at Floresville.

Dr. J. H. Lyons served from January 1, 1865, to October, 1865, when he was removed by Provisional Governor Hamilton and Daniel Cleveland appointed, who served to August, 1866, when Dr. Lyons was restored by act of the Throckmorton legislature. Lyons was elected again in January, 1864, and removed by the military authorities in 1867.

Dan Cleveland made a splendid reputation by his strong administration. To him fell the task of restoring order out of the confusion left by the southern Confederacy. Dr. J. H. Lyons was a man of sterling worth, but his administration was marred by the events incident to a change of government.


x x

We have now approached the period when San Antonio began to assume more the appearance of a modern city [illegible] of civil government under the wise and patriotic guidance of Governor E. J. Davis. It was an era of acute political agitation. In my next I will continue to enumerate mayors who have served the city well and honorably, and to whom, with their honorable predecessors, we can justly attribute the upbuilding of our city. If Mayor Hicks finds a rich heritage at his hand, it is because there have been others—he is not the only pebble on the beach, Street Commissioner Scott to the contrary notwithstanding.

JAMES P. NEWCOMB

Thursday, June 11, 2009

June 11 in San Antonio History...

1894
Representatives of San Antonio's Roman Catholic parish of St. Patrick voted to erect a new church building at Crosby and Van Ness.

1897
Custodian Bennett of the Alamo has discovered several traces of blood on the walls of the historic old building. They had been covered with whitewash.

1922
Brooks Field, as a lighter-than-air station, will be abandoned within the next few weeks.

1925
Texas University announced that a new college would be opened in the fall in San Antonio.

1936
President Franklin D. Roosevelt and his wife, Eleanor, visited San Antonio and placed a wreath at the Alamo.


Short Stops
What the People Are Saying (continued)
__________________________________________
William H. Dangerfield was mayor from January 8, 1839 to January 8, 1840. Mr. Dangerfield seems to have been a man well approved by his fellow citizens, although no portrait has been preserved of him.

S. A. Maverick was mayor from January 8, 1839 to January 8, 1840. Mr. Maverick was a distinguished citizen, a man of wealth, culture, and refinement; and a patriot. He served in trying times. He had no mutual admiration club to tell him that he was the only only, but he cast his lot here and stood by the town to the end of his long, honorable career.

Juan N. Seguin was mayor from August 17, 1841 to September 7, 1841. Colonel Seguin was a distinguished Texan patriot, and a man of ability. His descendants are still among us.

Edward Dwyer was mayor from March 30, 1844 to February 18, 1845. He served a second term from February 18, 1845 to January, 1846. Mr. Dwyer was not only a leading citizen in his day, but a man of marked character and there is no doubt that his fellow citizens appreciated his stellar worth. His grandchildren and a numerous relationship are here today, and need feel no slight to his memory if they are told that our present mayor is the only mayor our city has ever had.

Bryan Callaghan, the father of our distinguished ex-mayor Bryan Callaghan, was mayor from January 1, 1846 to January 1, 1847. I remember Mr. Callaghan well. He was a bluff, sturdy Irishman, a man of strong character and business ability; he was of the type of men who build up new countries--the pioneers of the world. There is no doubt of his being one of the mayors of San Antonio.

Bryan Callaghan, Sr., was succeeded by Charles F. King, from January 27th 1847 to January 1, 1848. Mr. King served a second term from April 1848 to January 1849. He was a courtly, educated gentleman who had served in the Mexican War.

We might here close the first chapter of mayors, as distinguished from their successors in office. All these men served the city as patriots with little or no remuneration. Politics, such as we know of today, were unknown. Things gradually became different as the city began to grow, and greed for office and the ambition for place took the foreground.

Wednesday, June 10, 2009

June 10 in San Antonio history...

1902
The sixth annual commencement of the Academy of Our Lady of the Lake will be held at the Opera House Wednesday morning.

1904
A burglar broke into San Antonio's Cosmopolitan Cafe, ignored cash and silverware, ate one piece of pie and departed.

1914
Responding to a proclamation of Mayor Brown, thousands of San Antonians stopped their work for a citywide 10-minute session of swatting flies. Health officials promoted the campaign.

1924
Preliminary plans were announced for construction near the heart of San Antonio of a Greek Orthodox Church building.

The following is from a series written by James P. Newcomb appearing on 30 and 31 December 1900 in the San Antonio Light. Newcomb spent most of his life as a newspaper man. He began his career at about age fourteen, when he was orphaned in San Antonio; his family having moved here from Nova Scotia, Canada. He was a staunch Unionist during the Civil War, a Republican during Reconstruction and after, postmaster here for a while, a farmer, and a founder of the Light.
Although they appeared originally in December, because of the recent local elections, it was felt that they might be of interest as a look at antecedents to the current City Council.


Short Stops

What the People Are Saying

___________________________________________________

During this season of peace on earth and good will, it may be churlish to criticize the many foolish and harmless acts performed by ordinarily sensible people. To those who have abundance much is given, well illustrated by the case of President McKinley and in a smaller way by our own local executive, Mayor Hicks.

A “Mutual Aid” club, reputed to be composed of city employes, who draw their substance from the tax payers’ purse, presented through their president a portrait of the mayor to the mayor as a Christmas gift.

In presenting this portrait our Republican street commissioner, Mr. Scott, gave utterance to the laudation that Mr. Hicks was the only mayor San Antonio ever had.

This assertion, no doubt, applies very aptly to Street Commissioner Scott and the club he spoke for, but there has been a long line of city executives dating back to the year 1837, in whose memory it would be appropriate to say they were all, or nearly all, good citizens, worthy officials and honest men.

John W. Smith, the first mayor, served from September 19th 1837 to March 9th 1838. He served a second term from January 8, 1840 to January 9, 1841; and a third term from April 18, 1842 to March 30, 1844. John W. Smith was an able, upright mayor, and conducted the city government well, especially considering the trying times of Mexican and Indian invasions. He was the grandfather of the Tobin boys. It cannot be said of him that he was not the mayor of San Antonio, notwithstanding the assertion of Street Commissioner Scott.

Tuesday, June 9, 2009

June 9 in San Antonio history...

1886
The cry for more pockets in gentlemen's clothing is being answered in this season's clothing, another pocket being added on the outside of the coat on the right side.

1894
A large portion of the roof of L. Wolfsons's department store at Main and Soledad was ripped off in a heavy windstorm.

1926
Mayor Tobin outlined plans to convert the downtown river into a veritable fairyland, rivaling in beauty the canals of Venice.

1932
The Southwestern Bell Telephone people are busy planning a campaign for the event they call the Big Conversion. They are getting ready to switch over to the dial telephone system.

Monday, June 8, 2009

June 8 in San Antonio History...

1902
Building permits. Congregation of Temple Beth-El to erect synagogue on Travis St. to cost $35,000.

1912
To the public: Tomorrow the San Antonio Traction Co. will inaugurate the use of pay-as-you-enter cars on the San Pedro-Army Post line. Have your nickel or transfer ready when you board; hand it to the conductor on the back platform.

1952
San Antonio's outstanding fathers will be honored by the Father's Day council on stage of the Majestic Theater at 8 p.m. Wednesday.

1955
Fess Parker, the Davy Crockett of the movies, signed autographs and gave kids a big thrill when he visited San Antonio.

Sunday, June 7, 2009

June 7 in San Antonio History...

1892
The children of the San Antonio public schools were given their grade cards this morning.

1894
A new diamond for the San Antonio baseball club was reported lacking only steam-rolling for completion. First game was set for June 16 against Austin.

1902
There will be a homing pigeon race today from New Orleans to the home coops in San Antonio - a distance of 502 miles.

1944
Aroused by news of D-Day the day before, Bexar County bond salesmen began hawking defense bonds four days ahead of the scheduled fifth War Loan drive.

Saturday, June 6, 2009

June 6 in San Antonio History...

1936
The remodeled Rainbow Terrace on the St. Anthony Hotel's roof opened to a near capacity crowd last night.

1947
To prevent the closing of Robert B. Green Hospital, county commissioners asked the city government for a contribution of $200,000. The commissioners said the money was needed to operate the Green for seven months.

1956
San Antonio's water level today had reached the lowest point in history. It was 620.90 feet above sea level.

Friday, June 5, 2009

June 5 in San Antonio History...

1895
San Antonians were joined by 20,000 visitors to see the fifth annual Battle of Flowers parade.

1925
Southern Pacific President W. R. Scott envisioned San Antonio as a future mammoth oil center with huge refineries and giant pipelines.

1926
Interstate Amusement Co. has purchased property on Houston St. between St. Mary's and Navarro and intends to build the largest theater in the south. (This would be the Majestic Theater.)

1932
Preparations to open the ROTC at Camp Bullis have been completed and orders have been issued for students of three CMTC camps to report for duty.

Thursday, June 4, 2009

June 4 in San Antonio History...

1892
Everybody invied to partake in a fine free lunch at the Riverside saloon opening tonight.

1906
Outhouses and shade trees were blown down by winds that roared into the city at 40 miles an hour last night.

1922
Residents of Alamo Heights voted unanimously to incorporate under the aldermanic form of government.

1944
Several San Antonio radio stations broadcast a false report, accidentally released nationwide by a press service, of an Allied invasion of Europe, setting off premature celebrations of D-Day.

Wednesday, June 3, 2009

June 3 in San Antonio History...

1902
The City Council has given the Daughters of the Confederacy Permission to erect a drinking fountain on Alamo Plaza.

1922
The first steps toward incorporation of Alamo Heights will be taken Saturday night when citizens meet at the schoolhouse.

1952
Santa Rosa Ave. and Laredo St. will become one-way thoroughfares at 9 a.m. Wednesday, Director J.W. Fitch of the police safely bureau, announced.

Tuesday, June 2, 2009

June 2 in San Antonio history...

1897
Complaint is made in some quarters that our present city administration that resolved itself into a one-man power that Mayor Callaghan dominates, not only as executive, but controls the legislative power of city government.

1906
The police and fire commission has forbidden members of the fire and police departments to be active in political affairs.

1966
The City Council has begun preparations for an election to see if San Antonio's water supply will be fluoridated.

Monday, June 1, 2009

June 1 in San Antonio History...

1894
Charges against a San Antonian for slapping his wife were dropped after he told city recorder she had:
1. hit him over the head with a guitar
2. clobbered him with a walking stick, and
3. emptied a pitcher of cold water over his bald head.

1897
The deeds conveying the 283-acre Brackenridge homestead north of San Antonio to the Sisters of Charity of the Incarnate Word were delivered to the sisters by Col. Brackenridge yesterday for $100,000.

1905
Mayor Bryan Callaghan was sworn in at midnight and immediately began appointing new city officials.

1924
Jack Neal Motor Co. entertained Nash and Lafayette owners with a picnic at Medina Lake. A caravan of 200 owners made the trip.